Incorrect Use Of Subject Verb Agreement

The problem with the sentence as it is written is that the subject of the sentence, “every night,” is singular, but the verb “were” is plural. The subject and the verb must match. The correct answer is, “Every night, five nights in a row, it was well below freezing.” Looking for subject-verb worksheets to better understand what subject-verb matching is? Print this page as a PDF and use it to check your understanding of what a subject-verb agreement is and the rules regarding the subject. Check your scores at the end of the subject-verb agreement worksheets and read the subject-verb agreement PDF as a guide. This rule sounds deceptively simple, but subject-verb compliance errors are quite common. Sharpen your grammar skills and get to the top of the useful subject-verb compliance rules below. The underlined part of the sentence contains a verb error with “marche”. “John and Susan”, while the two singular nouns are a plural and need a plural form instead of the singular “Runs”. “Run to the Finish line” is the right choice of answer. Rule 1: If there is a singular subject, you should compare it to a singular action or word. Rule 6: Sometimes, in examples of the subject-verb structure, you will find the subject before the word of. In this case, you should check if your action or speech matches the subject in order to avoid an error in the subject-verb agreement. Here are some subject verb examples: Here are two sets of subject-verb-conformity exercises for you: This sentence contains an error in the subject-verb concordance.

The theme of the sentence is “reports”, so the verb “a” must be changed to the plural “have” to be consistent with the plural theme “relations”. The subject-worm agreement means that a subject and a word of action must always match. If you know that the list is the subject, then select is for the verb. The problem with the sentence is that the verb “are” is a plural form, but corresponds to “One”, a singular noun, although “boy” comes closest to the verb in the sentence. . . .