Design Climate Agreement

must be considered in a broader context of sustainable development (e.g. B World Bank, 2009), which requires an assessment of the overall impact of climate policy on human well-being and ecosystem health. Similarly, better measures are needed to compare different outcomes, as mentioned above, and especially because regions, sectors, regions, local communities and even different groups within communities are different exposed to climate change and efforts to limit and adapt to it (see Chapter 16). It is also important to consider equality between social groups and time so that current efforts to limit or adapt to climate change do not have a major negative impact on human well-being and ecosystem health for decades or centuries. Given that equity effects are important elements in the national and international climate policy debate, an informed understanding of these issues would contribute to both policy-making, adoption and implementation. Voluntary agreements between industry and government have played a role in the development of national policies and accelerated the introduction of the best available technology, but have not achieved significant emission reductions. How can international agreements use an adaptive risk management approach to respond to climate change? We signed because as architects, planners and designers, we want to be part of the solution. As we manage the planning and construction process, we are committed to doing so in a way that our customers can achieve sustainability goals. Here`s what we`re going to do. Many methods exist or have been proposed to perform more direct GHG measurements. For example, CO2 could be measured directly from large concentrated sources to complement indirect measurements calculated from fuel inputs (Ackerman and Sundquist, 2008).

An extensive network of high measurements of the tower, aircraft and satellite of atmospheric CO2 (including its isotopic signature) could be combined with atmospheric circulation models to obtain regional anthropogenic CO2 signals between natural sources and CO2 sinks. In particular, a high-resolution satellite system, such as the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (which crashed at launch in February 2009), could provide the critical baseline CO2 information to verify decadent CO2 trends under a climate agreement (NRC, 2009h). . . .